Macro photography. What is it?

Macro photography is one of the most accessible and popular types of image capture. It refers to close-up and enlarged images of very small objects or tiny living organisms.
Macro photography, therefore, seeks to immortalize what might be microscopic. 
Credit: DigiDirect
Extreme close-up shots require a macro lens
In general, an image is considered to be macro when the subject has a ratio of 1:1 or more, to the camera's sensor. The idea is to have a "life-size" projection. A ratio of 1:1 means that a 2 cm subject has a 2 cm projection on the sensor. With a 1:2 ratio, a 2 cm subject takes 1 cm of the sensor size, and so on. Macro photography can be considered up to a magnification of 1:10.
Credit: DigiDirect
The world often looks very different at close range…
This technique is used to reveal details that usually are unnoticed by the eye. Macro photography is a large part of nature photography: insects, flowers, eyes, water droplets are subjects that are found most of the time. But macro photography is also often used in scientific research, in order to better study the small world around us. Indeed, macro allows the human eye to distinguish the smallest details and the finest textures, whether they are small insects, miniature plants or mineral rocks.
Pictures can be taken in the studio or outdoors. Thanks to digital advances, macro photography has become accessible to anyone curious and patient enough to experiment with it. Indeed, the photographer can spend hours looking for the perfect shot, encouraging him or her to really look around.
Credit: PetaPixel
Photographer Sasi Kumar with his photo: " An ant drinks from a water droplet."
It’s often said that the best camera is the one you have with you!
In conclusion, macro photography plunges the photographer and his audience into a tiny universe, which is not visible to the naked eye. Thanks to this technique, we can discern the tiniest details of this world brought back to a large scale, whether for biological reasons, or to marvel at these fascinating and sometimes even abstract art forms.
  
Credit photos: Renee Campbell
Reference: DigiDirect - Pinterest

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